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Roxanna Meta:
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Posts tagged "women"

tallestsilver:

bellechere:

I haven’t for over half a year, now. In fact, I’ve been 100% single this whole time.

I wasn’t going to say anything - because it was private, and I was in a great deal of pain, and I didn’t want to make a big deal out of it - but now I’ve come to the point where I’m getting pretty annoyed by people saying ‘your husband is so lucky’.

In fact, even when married, I was miffed by that phrase. Whenever the line has been delivered to me, it’s been in conjunction with ‘a woman that’s beautiful/intelligent/into gaming/into comics is so rare, your husband is so lucky’. This intended compliment not only glorifies me (ick), but alludes that these characteristics can only be appreciated by my significant other. Hey, you can appreciate my being a fan of comics and gaming, and my smarts, and my looks without being married to me. The only things my husband ever had that I don’t offer everyone else was sex and unwavering devotion. So it leads me to believe that when I’m given this ‘compliment’, it’s just masquerading as wishing you could have sex with me, which I don’t perceive as a compliment. At all.

Clearly a relationship is based on more than just comics, games, beauty, and smarts. Please stop simplifying me and the basis of marriage/a relationship.

Men, please stop saying someone’s husband/boyfriend is ‘so lucky’, and start appreciating the traits of a woman as a friend would.

MIC DROP

comicbookcosplay:

What is “Ladies of Power”?

"Ladies of Power" is a 12 month calendar project celebrating female empowerment and women of all shapes, sizes, and colors. It’s primarily a cosplay calendar, but also some of the cosplayers are also alt models, burlesque dancers, artists, and other incredible women all coming together to celebrate what it means to be a woman. 

This calendar includes a variety of different women between ages 19 and 55.  It also includes women of color, LGBT, trans*, maternity, curvy voluptuous women - generally truly beautiful women you tend to not always see featured in calendars, especially ones involving cosplayers. :) All women in the calendar are local to the Dallas/Ft Worth, Texas metroplex. 

Each month is a different geeky media category - Literature, Sci Fi, Anime, Video Games, Comics, etc. Characters range from historical beauties like Audrey Hepburn, to Harry Potter’s  Hermione Granger, to X-Men’s Storm, to Spider-man’s Black Cat, to anime’s Sailor Moon, to horror star Freddy Kreuger, to a female incarnation of the Doctor from Doctor Who, and beyond!

(And did we mention, one month features a sexy trio of Black Cat (Spider-man), Catwoman (Batman), and Cheetah (Catwoman) getting their feline prowess on together? ;) That’s something you don’t want to miss!) 

We feel beauty and power come in all forms and it’s not something you typically see in mainstream media and even in niche circles like nerd communities and that’s a shame. Beauty is subjective and we want to provide a product that caters to many different beauty and power ideals other than what is currently on the market. 

But what of the empowerment aspect? We focus on empowerment because ALL proceeds of the calendars sales once they’re printed will go to the Genesis Women’s Shelter in Dallas, Texas.  This shelter provides resources for women and children who suffer from abuse, addiction, poverty, etc - including:

  • shelter
  • food
  • clothing
  • access to internet and phones
  • childcare for children too young for school
  • medical assistance for those recovering from addiction and/or abuse
  • legal aid for those saving themselves and/or their family from an abusive situation
  • assistance with job acquisition to help get women, especially singe mothers, out of poverty
  • assistance with acquiring affordable safe vehicles and apartment homes
  • therapy and counseling for all women and children in the shelter
  • a 24 hour help hotline

and tons of other valuable resources to those in need!

We’re hoping the images in the calendar and the proceeds of said calendar’s sales will help to better empower the women at this shelter and many more all over the world. :) 

To get this thing printed please DONATE HERE! (It will cost $1,250 USD to print 250 high quality copies from a very wonderful, green company) 

So please take a moment to support a worthwhile cause featuring some very sexy, powerful babes! And if you can’t donate to the cause you can help by spreading the word! 

Wow!!

(via thatdjspider)

gailsimone:

thebanegrimm:

Left is the new Wonder Woman. Being deemed still too skinny and frail.
Right is Kacy Catanzaro, the first female to advance to the finals of American Ninja. Considered strong and inspiring to female athletes.
Stop assuming someone is weak based off your closed minded ignorant ideals.

Wow.

I hadn’t really considered this. Interesting point!

(via tallestsilver)

Asker Anonymous Asks:
So there was this outrage against the depiction of rape in the comic, Kick Ass 2. Enough so that the movie adaptation had the scene changed. This is a series known for its brutal violence which includes murders. Why is murder not as controversial as rape?
roxannameta roxannameta Said:

tallestsilver:

Trigger warning for any of my followers. Just scroll away if you have to. 

Because murder has no immediate survivors who have to suffer through the experience of being brutalized and rape survivors do? Because there is a HUGE culture around rape and how the victim somehow led to their rape, but nobody really accuses a murder victim of being sooo easy to kill or that they were asking for it. Because it’s used so dismissively. Because there’s more evidence of a murder, but most rape goes unreported. 

Like, seriously Anon? And you must be seriously cowardly and expecting some backlash since you are on Anonymous.

Also, that rape scene you spoke of? Just another attempt for Millar to be OMG SO EDGY LOOK RED MIST  MOTHER FUCKER JUST RAPED A GIRL.  

No. It’s not edgy. It’s not dark. This happens too frequently. 

O Silver my Silver

Silv? Silv? Silv, let’s do a Marie Antoinette shoot. Silv…??

(via albinwonderland)

Flawless

Flawless

(via albinwonderland)

mysticjc:

Alphonse Mucha

"Alfons Maria Mucha (Ivančice, 24 July 1860 – Prague, 14 July 1939), often known in English and French as Alphonse Mucha, was a Czech Art Nouveau painter and decorative artist, known best for his distinct style. He produced many paintings, illustrations, advertisements, postcards, and designs."

(via celticruinsdesigns)

throneroom-of-the-damned:

Body Positivity for the win.

9 out of 16 are WoC from 9 different nationalities - Spanish, Native American, Middle Eastern, Greek, Hawaiian, South African, Indian, African-American and Chinese.

Even the “white” people don’t all come from the same place - French, Irish, American, Scottish, German, and English.

I’m really sorry if I left out YOUR nationality or YOUR body type, but if I kept going to include every single possible woman in the world I’d never have time for sleep or school work.

This made me tear up a little. Heh

(via rawwomen)

liontortellini:

Just a couple days ago, I watched Air with three of my cousins: an eleven-year old boy, a ten-year old girl, and a six-year old boy. (Really, I only meant to show them the first two episodes! I was going to space them out! But the kids wanted to keep going till four hours later we couldn’t keep going, haha.)
When Asami is introduced, not very long after she took off her helmet — and I mean, during that scene, before the audience knows anything about her — the eleven-year old said, very definitely, “She’s a bad guy.”
"She’s not bad."
"Yeah, she is," he said, and his sister was nodding beside him.
So why, I asked (pausing the video), did they think Asami was bad?
"Because look at her," said the ten-year old, and we all looked at her.
Again, the eleven-year old said, confident, “She’s gonna be bad,” and the six-year old said, “She’s mean!”
But they didn’t know anything about her.
What they meant was this: media (and specifically children’s media, although certainly media intended for adults indulges in this too) has taught them that Certain Women Are Bad. This is something they expect now in the cartoons they watch, that a girl who wears make-up, who is very feminine, is — if there’s another girl who’s tomboyish or at least not overtly feminine — a Bad Girl. To my cousins, one of whom is only six, Asami was immediately pegged as Evil because a) she wears make-up and she’s feminine and b) she’s a rival for Mako’s affections. Thus she must be a bad guy, right? Korra likes Mako and Korra’s the Hero, thus she’s the Good Girl, so if Asami likes Mako, that means Asami is the Bad Girl. “She wears short skirts, I wear sneakers,” etc.
But of course, Asami is one of the kindest characters in all the Avatar universe. She’s friendly, she’s gracious, she assumes the best of everyone, she’s fun and sweet, outgoing and confident. When she learns that Korra likes Mako, she doesn’t turn on Korra or make demands of her. Only when Asami realizes that Mako likes Korra back does she call anyone out, and the only person she calls out is Mako. She defends Bolin from Mako when Mako gets angry with Bolin for spilling the beans re: the kiss, and she still stands by and supports Korra.
By the end of the season, all my cousins loved Asami. They were all furious on her behalf with regards to the love triangle, and her final confrontation with her father had the eleven-year old heartbroken. 
Media matters. Children’s media matters. Kids learn from the shows they watch and the books they read. What they learn, often, is that there are right ways to be a woman and wrong ways to be a woman, when the truth is that there is never a wrong way to be a woman. I hope there will be more Asami Satos in the fiction my cousins consume in the future: more Asamis, more Korras, more Lins and Pemas, Jinoras and Ikkis; that my cousins won’t always need me to be there with them to explain it doesn’t matter if a woman wears short skirts or sneakers, neither or both, because these things do not define her worth.

Like Charlotte in Princess and the Frog!
Although Asami ALSO has the Evil Chick Look: pale skin, dark hair, red lips and a fine, angled face. Don’t forget that too.

liontortellini:

Just a couple days ago, I watched Air with three of my cousins: an eleven-year old boy, a ten-year old girl, and a six-year old boy. (Really, I only meant to show them the first two episodes! I was going to space them out! But the kids wanted to keep going till four hours later we couldn’t keep going, haha.)

When Asami is introduced, not very long after she took off her helmet — and I mean, during that scene, before the audience knows anything about her — the eleven-year old said, very definitely, “She’s a bad guy.”

"She’s not bad."

"Yeah, she is," he said, and his sister was nodding beside him.

So why, I asked (pausing the video), did they think Asami was bad?

"Because look at her," said the ten-year old, and we all looked at her.

Again, the eleven-year old said, confident, “She’s gonna be bad,” and the six-year old said, “She’s mean!”

But they didn’t know anything about her.

What they meant was this: media (and specifically children’s media, although certainly media intended for adults indulges in this too) has taught them that Certain Women Are Bad. This is something they expect now in the cartoons they watch, that a girl who wears make-up, who is very feminine, is — if there’s another girl who’s tomboyish or at least not overtly feminine — a Bad Girl. To my cousins, one of whom is only six, Asami was immediately pegged as Evil because a) she wears make-up and she’s feminine and b) she’s a rival for Mako’s affections. Thus she must be a bad guy, right? Korra likes Mako and Korra’s the Hero, thus she’s the Good Girl, so if Asami likes Mako, that means Asami is the Bad Girl. “She wears short skirts, I wear sneakers,” etc.

But of course, Asami is one of the kindest characters in all the Avatar universe. She’s friendly, she’s gracious, she assumes the best of everyone, she’s fun and sweet, outgoing and confident. When she learns that Korra likes Mako, she doesn’t turn on Korra or make demands of her. Only when Asami realizes that Mako likes Korra back does she call anyone out, and the only person she calls out is Mako. She defends Bolin from Mako when Mako gets angry with Bolin for spilling the beans re: the kiss, and she still stands by and supports Korra.

By the end of the season, all my cousins loved Asami. They were all furious on her behalf with regards to the love triangle, and her final confrontation with her father had the eleven-year old heartbroken. 

Media matters. Children’s media matters. Kids learn from the shows they watch and the books they read. What they learn, often, is that there are right ways to be a woman and wrong ways to be a woman, when the truth is that there is never a wrong way to be a woman. I hope there will be more Asami Satos in the fiction my cousins consume in the future: more Asamis, more Korras, more Lins and Pemas, Jinoras and Ikkis; that my cousins won’t always need me to be there with them to explain it doesn’t matter if a woman wears short skirts or sneakers, neither or both, because these things do not define her worth.

Like Charlotte in Princess and the Frog!

Although Asami ALSO has the Evil Chick Look: pale skin, dark hair, red lips and a fine, angled face. Don’t forget that too.

(via albinwonderland)

To suggest that one’s belly, body hair or tattoo is ‘distasteful’ and should therefore be covered in the name of etiquette is the very worst sort of body fascism. If your children are traumatised by the sight of a fat person in a bikini, a bit of cellulite or a caesarean scar, then may I tentatively suggest that you aren’t raising them correctly. If seeing someone hairy wearing something skimpy renders you ‘unable to eat your lunch’ then I’m afraid my diagnosis is the problem is with your brain, not their body.