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Asker Anonymous Asks:
So there was this outrage against the depiction of rape in the comic, Kick Ass 2. Enough so that the movie adaptation had the scene changed. This is a series known for its brutal violence which includes murders. Why is murder not as controversial as rape?
roxannameta roxannameta Said:

tallestsilver:

Trigger warning for any of my followers. Just scroll away if you have to. 

Because murder has no immediate survivors who have to suffer through the experience of being brutalized and rape survivors do? Because there is a HUGE culture around rape and how the victim somehow led to their rape, but nobody really accuses a murder victim of being sooo easy to kill or that they were asking for it. Because it’s used so dismissively. Because there’s more evidence of a murder, but most rape goes unreported. 

Like, seriously Anon? And you must be seriously cowardly and expecting some backlash since you are on Anonymous.

Also, that rape scene you spoke of? Just another attempt for Millar to be OMG SO EDGY LOOK RED MIST  MOTHER FUCKER JUST RAPED A GIRL.  

No. It’s not edgy. It’s not dark. This happens too frequently. 

O Silver my Silver

Silv? Silv? Silv, let’s do a Marie Antoinette shoot. Silv…??

(via albinwonderland)

Flawless

Flawless

(via albinwonderland)

mysticjc:

Alphonse Mucha

"Alfons Maria Mucha (Ivančice, 24 July 1860 – Prague, 14 July 1939), often known in English and French as Alphonse Mucha, was a Czech Art Nouveau painter and decorative artist, known best for his distinct style. He produced many paintings, illustrations, advertisements, postcards, and designs."

(via celticruinsdesigns)

throneroom-of-the-damned:

Body Positivity for the win.

9 out of 16 are WoC from 9 different nationalities - Spanish, Native American, Middle Eastern, Greek, Hawaiian, South African, Indian, African-American and Chinese.

Even the “white” people don’t all come from the same place - French, Irish, American, Scottish, German, and English.

I’m really sorry if I left out YOUR nationality or YOUR body type, but if I kept going to include every single possible woman in the world I’d never have time for sleep or school work.

This made me tear up a little. Heh

(via rawwomen)

liontortellini:

Just a couple days ago, I watched Air with three of my cousins: an eleven-year old boy, a ten-year old girl, and a six-year old boy. (Really, I only meant to show them the first two episodes! I was going to space them out! But the kids wanted to keep going till four hours later we couldn’t keep going, haha.)
When Asami is introduced, not very long after she took off her helmet — and I mean, during that scene, before the audience knows anything about her — the eleven-year old said, very definitely, “She’s a bad guy.”
"She’s not bad."
"Yeah, she is," he said, and his sister was nodding beside him.
So why, I asked (pausing the video), did they think Asami was bad?
"Because look at her," said the ten-year old, and we all looked at her.
Again, the eleven-year old said, confident, “She’s gonna be bad,” and the six-year old said, “She’s mean!”
But they didn’t know anything about her.
What they meant was this: media (and specifically children’s media, although certainly media intended for adults indulges in this too) has taught them that Certain Women Are Bad. This is something they expect now in the cartoons they watch, that a girl who wears make-up, who is very feminine, is — if there’s another girl who’s tomboyish or at least not overtly feminine — a Bad Girl. To my cousins, one of whom is only six, Asami was immediately pegged as Evil because a) she wears make-up and she’s feminine and b) she’s a rival for Mako’s affections. Thus she must be a bad guy, right? Korra likes Mako and Korra’s the Hero, thus she’s the Good Girl, so if Asami likes Mako, that means Asami is the Bad Girl. “She wears short skirts, I wear sneakers,” etc.
But of course, Asami is one of the kindest characters in all the Avatar universe. She’s friendly, she’s gracious, she assumes the best of everyone, she’s fun and sweet, outgoing and confident. When she learns that Korra likes Mako, she doesn’t turn on Korra or make demands of her. Only when Asami realizes that Mako likes Korra back does she call anyone out, and the only person she calls out is Mako. She defends Bolin from Mako when Mako gets angry with Bolin for spilling the beans re: the kiss, and she still stands by and supports Korra.
By the end of the season, all my cousins loved Asami. They were all furious on her behalf with regards to the love triangle, and her final confrontation with her father had the eleven-year old heartbroken. 
Media matters. Children’s media matters. Kids learn from the shows they watch and the books they read. What they learn, often, is that there are right ways to be a woman and wrong ways to be a woman, when the truth is that there is never a wrong way to be a woman. I hope there will be more Asami Satos in the fiction my cousins consume in the future: more Asamis, more Korras, more Lins and Pemas, Jinoras and Ikkis; that my cousins won’t always need me to be there with them to explain it doesn’t matter if a woman wears short skirts or sneakers, neither or both, because these things do not define her worth.

Like Charlotte in Princess and the Frog!
Although Asami ALSO has the Evil Chick Look: pale skin, dark hair, red lips and a fine, angled face. Don’t forget that too.

liontortellini:

Just a couple days ago, I watched Air with three of my cousins: an eleven-year old boy, a ten-year old girl, and a six-year old boy. (Really, I only meant to show them the first two episodes! I was going to space them out! But the kids wanted to keep going till four hours later we couldn’t keep going, haha.)

When Asami is introduced, not very long after she took off her helmet — and I mean, during that scene, before the audience knows anything about her — the eleven-year old said, very definitely, “She’s a bad guy.”

"She’s not bad."

"Yeah, she is," he said, and his sister was nodding beside him.

So why, I asked (pausing the video), did they think Asami was bad?

"Because look at her," said the ten-year old, and we all looked at her.

Again, the eleven-year old said, confident, “She’s gonna be bad,” and the six-year old said, “She’s mean!”

But they didn’t know anything about her.

What they meant was this: media (and specifically children’s media, although certainly media intended for adults indulges in this too) has taught them that Certain Women Are Bad. This is something they expect now in the cartoons they watch, that a girl who wears make-up, who is very feminine, is — if there’s another girl who’s tomboyish or at least not overtly feminine — a Bad Girl. To my cousins, one of whom is only six, Asami was immediately pegged as Evil because a) she wears make-up and she’s feminine and b) she’s a rival for Mako’s affections. Thus she must be a bad guy, right? Korra likes Mako and Korra’s the Hero, thus she’s the Good Girl, so if Asami likes Mako, that means Asami is the Bad Girl. “She wears short skirts, I wear sneakers,” etc.

But of course, Asami is one of the kindest characters in all the Avatar universe. She’s friendly, she’s gracious, she assumes the best of everyone, she’s fun and sweet, outgoing and confident. When she learns that Korra likes Mako, she doesn’t turn on Korra or make demands of her. Only when Asami realizes that Mako likes Korra back does she call anyone out, and the only person she calls out is Mako. She defends Bolin from Mako when Mako gets angry with Bolin for spilling the beans re: the kiss, and she still stands by and supports Korra.

By the end of the season, all my cousins loved Asami. They were all furious on her behalf with regards to the love triangle, and her final confrontation with her father had the eleven-year old heartbroken. 

Media matters. Children’s media matters. Kids learn from the shows they watch and the books they read. What they learn, often, is that there are right ways to be a woman and wrong ways to be a woman, when the truth is that there is never a wrong way to be a woman. I hope there will be more Asami Satos in the fiction my cousins consume in the future: more Asamis, more Korras, more Lins and Pemas, Jinoras and Ikkis; that my cousins won’t always need me to be there with them to explain it doesn’t matter if a woman wears short skirts or sneakers, neither or both, because these things do not define her worth.

Like Charlotte in Princess and the Frog!

Although Asami ALSO has the Evil Chick Look: pale skin, dark hair, red lips and a fine, angled face. Don’t forget that too.

(via albinwonderland)

To suggest that one’s belly, body hair or tattoo is ‘distasteful’ and should therefore be covered in the name of etiquette is the very worst sort of body fascism. If your children are traumatised by the sight of a fat person in a bikini, a bit of cellulite or a caesarean scar, then may I tentatively suggest that you aren’t raising them correctly. If seeing someone hairy wearing something skimpy renders you ‘unable to eat your lunch’ then I’m afraid my diagnosis is the problem is with your brain, not their body.

tabzthemighty:

Just thought I would get on here for a second to talk about why I’m so proud to be a part of this group. These are the Lightning Bolts, our answer to Iron Man’s Ironettes and Captain America’s USO girls.

Not only did we design and produce identical costumes at the last minute before DragonCon to help Tally’s dream of doing this come true, we also took a stand for the ladies.

On two seperate occasions that night members of our group were sexually harrassed. Both times the Lightning Bolts took matters into their own hands and made it known that not only was it not acceptable,  but it wasn’t going to just slide by. The first guy was removed from the con, the second who actually physically assaulted the girl was arrested. In both cases the girls stood their ground and in one case chased him across the hotel in 4 1/2” platform wedges so that he wouldnt escape authorities.

So basically you shouldnt sexually harass a group of girls who fangirl over the god of thunder.

I was about three feet away from the second incident and let me tell you, this group sprang to ACTION. <3 <3 <3 LADIES!!

kawaii-turds:

So. I wont fuck around with any sort of story here.

I was slipped Rohypnol Sunday night of DragonCon and have no memory from 11pm-5am. Luckily, I did have a friend with me so nothing happened to me but I did do a lot of very inappropriate things. He thought I was just really drunk and didn’t stop me. I am really not proud of the things I was told I did but so far they haven’t seemed to follow me. I was taken advantage of, but I wasn’t raped. Apparently I just made out with a bunch of random guys. Which is 100% not like me. 
Police say it was more than likely a blanket attack and that a bunch of random drinks were spiked. Since I was with a group of people nothing happened to me though. I am very very lucky. 

From now on if I ever do drink at a convention again, I will only be using my own flask. No more open drinks for me.

So. ladies (and gentlemen alike) just because you are at a convention, does not make you safe. And it has nothing to do with how you are dressed either. I was in a tank top, jacket, blue jeans, and flip flops when this happened.

I’m going to be reblogging every one of these stories, fair warning. The more people are talking about the harassment and violations that go on at the con, the better.

I had an *amazing* time at Dragon Con, but I also had a handful of moments that were staggeringly inappropriate. Luckily nothing like this - thanks, girl, for sharing your story.

bornofanatombomb:

I’m not sure everyone fully understands con harassment.

There’s been a lot of talk about recently, a great deal of online sharing of experiences from the women who have been on the receiving end of unwanted groping—or worse—in what is supposed to be a safe place for geeks of stripes. Which has been wonderful, for reasons I’ll get into. But I’m seeing so many of the same responses to these discussions that I’m not sure everyone understands what con harassment really is.

And by “everyone” I’m really talking about dudes. Women seem to understand this just fine. So, let’s sit down, guys, and talk this out. Bro to bro.

To start with, con harassment is rarely done by socially awkward men. I see this confusion over and over. Socially awkward men may have uncomfortable conversations. They may spend too much time staring at woman’s cleavage. They may not take a hint that a conversation is done. But if you’ve ever spent some time around socially awkward men (and you probably have, it’s a big world) you may have noticed that they don’t touch people. Touching adds an extra layer of complication to social interaction, one that can easily be avoided by not touching. So they don’t.

Because—and let’s be clear on this guys—while awkward conversations and horrible sexist speech are problems, the big concern in con harassment is physical violation. Groping, inappropriate touching and other, worse forms of invasion of a woman’s personal space. This is rarely done by socially awkward men.

The kind of guys who grope women at cons are socially aware. They can recognize social signals of when a women is with a man who cares about her, or when she is functionally “alone.” They know when the social contract of silence can be enforced, when the atmosphere of drunkenness will provide them with an excuse, when they can have an easy getaway. These are not socially awkward men. Often they are talkers, practiced in using social rules to get what they want. Because they think they can get away with it.

Which brings me to my next point, bros. It doesn’t help when you say you would punish someone if and when you saw con harassment. First off, you’re not going to see it. The socially aware groper can read your good intentions toward the women around you, and will bide his time until you are not around. Secondly, the damage has been done. A woman has been made to feel unsafe in what should be a safe space. Physically harming the groper is not going to make her feel safe again. If anything, it creates a larger culture of violence.

Think of it like arson. Sure, you can catch the guy who burned a woman’s house down and break his legs, but she’s still without a house. The damage has been done.

This is not to say con harassers should not be punished. They certainly should not be allowed to return to the convention. They should be appropriately shunned by their community. But threatening them with bodily harm doesn’t solve anything.

Which brings me to my last point. While I do not doubt that some of them men who I have heard say they would act would, in fact punch a groper in the face, I know that most of you guys would not do anything.

This has nothing to do with your masculinity, or your ability to dish out bone-crunching violence. It has nothing to do with you being men. It has to do with being a human being. We’re social animals. Which means that once the party has started, no one wants it to stop. Most people are more than willing to excuse harassment, if it means an awkward moment has passed.

My wife and I were at a Christmas party a few years back, and while she was bent over to grab a drink, another party-goer slapped her butt so hard it was heard throughout the party. She was in tears. I was livid. I never been so close to hurting some one than I was at that moment. The guy tried to play it off, that he was drunk, that was just something they did at this party. He was backed up on this by many party goers, who just wanted the party to get back to what it was. Included in this was the guy’s girlfriend, who told me she routinely receives worse slaps from the guy, and it was all in good fun.

Think about that for a moment. A woman wanted to sweep this event under the rug so bad that she said she was routinely beaten by her boyfriend, and it was no big deal. I don’t think she knew what she was saying. She only wanted the moment to pass, and for me not cave her boyfriend’s face in.

We ended up leaving the party without me fighting anyone, and cutting those people out of our lives. But I think about that party every time someone claims that if they saw what happened, they would act against the abuser. At the party, no one joined me arguing against this guy, no one but me was ready to hit him. And this was an undisputed act of violence against my wife. No one claimed it didn’t happen. Several people saw it, even more heard it. But no one wanted the party to stop.

Any sort of recompense after the fact is going to be met with resistance. Gropers are usually people who are charming otherwise, and used to getting away with things. There will be people who come to their defense, because they don’t fit the image of a sexual predator. They’re a nice guy. They were just drunk. It’s not going to happen again. That’s him being him. Hurting someone in the midst of this is not going to change peoples’ minds about the guy.

Gropers know this. They are counting on it.

Dudes, I understand, you want to do something. It’s bad enough that men who sexually assault women at cons don’t have signifiers like awkwardness, and now I’m saying that your need for vengeance is impotent, or, at best, counterproductive. What are we guys supposed to do?

The best thing we can do, bros, is talk about this. We will raise our voices in support of the women who are telling their assault stories, and make their voices louder with our chorus. We will say that we know this happens, and we know that the men who do it are scuzzballs. We will not threaten them with violence should they get caught, because we know that violence does a safe space make. We will say that the men who do this sort of behavior do not deserve our respect, and will we remember that we have said that when a groper is revealed to be a friend.

Con harassment succeeds because of a culture of silence, of a willingness to ignore this behavior out of shock, out of denial, out of a need to not to be a buzzkill. We can break this silence, guys. If enough people talk about this problem, understand it, and loudly voice their disapproval, then gropers will no longer see conventions as spaces they can assault women and get away with it.

Because the only remedy for con harassment is to make sure that it doesn’t happen in the first place.

(via oliviasatelier)